Visualizing Environmental Science

This course will explore data collection practices in environmental sciences and how visualizations are used to convey scientific information. Throughout history, humans have developed endless ways to communicate their observations about the natural word visually, from markings on rock and sand, to smoke signals, knots on rocks, pencil drawings and complex 3D computer models. Visual literacy is an important part of the storytelling of science and a vast field of practice and research. This course will focus specifically on visual literacy as applied to environmental science data. Students will study existing data sets and imagery related to Earth systems and discuss how they are used by scientists, media, policymakers and the general public. They will also practice environmental science techniques through hands-on activities and create their own graphs and other images to communicate their findings.

Course Details
Prefix: 
UCO
Course Number: 
1200
Section Number(s) and Day/Times Taught: 
156: MW 2:00pm - 3:15pm
185: TR 2:00pm - 3:15pm
Term: 
Fall 2021
Categories: 
Global Issues
Sustainability
STEM
Instructor(s)

Marta Toran

Marta Toran

Marta Toran is the Outreach Coordinator for the Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences. She develops and facilitates science programs for K-12 students and their teachers both on campus and at their school. She is also an adjunct instructor in the Biology Department where she has taught aspiring middle and high school science teachers in the Secondary Science Education Program. Marta studied zoology at the University of New Hampshire and worked in marine laboratories before she headed to the UK to complete her science teaching degree at Oxford University. After teaching science and Spanish in middle and high schools in both the UK and the US, she went on to get a Masters of Science in science education at Montana State University. Marta's interest in outreach stems from a conviction that sharing the passion scientists feel towards their research with school students and their teachers will not only inspire the next generation of scientists, but will also help students become responsible citizens of the world.